Drugs found where the sun don’t shine! — ‘Strange walk’ helps cops nab dealer

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NEW BERN – District Attorney Scott Thomas announced this week that Donald Cox, Jr. 31, of New Bern, pleaded guilty to charges connected to selling heroin, and was sentenced to prison for more than six years.

Superior Court Judge G. Frank Johns presided over this term of court, and the cases were prosecuted in court by Assistant District Attorney Matt Wareham.


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Agents with the Coastal Narcotics Enforcement Team were engaged in a series of controlled purchases of heroin from dealers in Craven County.

After having successfully completed several purchases, they identified Cox as a seller of narcotics in the New Bern and Havelock areas.

Through the use of a confidential informant, Coastal Narcotics Enforcement Team set up a purchase of heroin for $1,500. The informant contacted Cox and made arrangements for the purchase; however, the deal was not completed because Cox apparently became suspicious.

A short time later, though, Cox called the informant, asking to complete the deal. When Cox arrived at the pre-arranged location, agents with Coastal Narcotics Enforcement Team agents stopped him and conducted a search of him and his vehicle, but found no controlled substances.

They did notice that Cox was walking strangely, and the agents suspected that Cox was carrying drugs in a body cavity. They arrested Cox, and a full search revealed that Cox had wrapped drugs in plastic wrap and inserted them into his body.

He was carrying 2.64 grams of cocaine and 11.49 grams of heroin, which is a trafficking amount.

Judge Johns sentenced Cox to a prison term of 70 to 93 months, and imposed a mandatory $50,000 fine. He also ordered Cox to pay more than $4,600 in court costs and fees, including court-appointed attorney fees.


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PRESS RELEASE

NEW BERN – District Attorney Scott Thomas announced that, in Craven County Superior Court yesterday, DONALD COX, JR., 31, of New Bern, pled guilty to charges connected to selling heroin, and was sentenced to prison for more than six years. Superior Court Judge G. Frank Johns presided over this term of court, and the cases were prosecuted in court by Assistant District Attorney Matt Wareham.

Agents with the Coastal Narcotics Enforcement Team (CNET) were engaged in a series of controlled purchases of heroin from dealers in Craven County. After having successfully completed several purchases, they identified Cox as a seller of narcotics in the New Bern and Havelock areas. Through the use of a confidential informant, CNET set up a purchase of heroin for $ 1,500.00. The informant contacted Cox and made arrangements for the purchase; however, the deal was not complete because Cox apparently became suspicious. A short time later, though, Cox called the informant, asking to complete the deal. When Cox arrived at the pre-arranged location, CNET agents stopped him and conducted a search of him and his vehicle, but found no controlled substances. They did notice that Cox was walking strangely, and the agents suspected that Cox was carrying drugs in a body cavity. They arrested Cox, and a full search revealed that Cox had wrapped drugs in plastic wrap and inserted them in his body. He was carrying 2.64 grams of cocaine and 11.49 grams of heroin, which is a trafficking amount.

Cox pled guilty to the following counts: Trafficking in Heroin by Possession and Transportation; Possession with Intent to Sell Cocaine and Heroin; Possession of Schedule I and Schedule II Controlled Substances; and two other charges unrelated to the drug sales.

Judge Johns sentenced Cox to a prison term of 70 to 93 months, and imposed a mandatory $ 50,000 fine. He also ordered Cox to pay more than $ 4,600 in court costs and fees, including court-appointed attorney fees.

NOTE: Under North Carolina Structured Sentencing law, a convicted criminal defendant must serve all of the minimum active sentence and may be required to serve up to the maximum sentence. Upon release at the conclusion of the prison sentence, a nine to twelve month period of post-release supervision by a probation officer is required.