Category Archives: EDUCATION

Amaré Jarvis headed to regional of Scripps National Spelling Bee

‘Not nervous’ says fourth grader at Fred A. Anderson Elementary

BAYBORO — Every year, students from all walks of life have the opportunity to participate in the Scripps National Spelling Bee. Youngsters progress from classroom to cafeteria, from auditorium to civic center, delighting friends, family, and sponsors along the way!

THE BEE’S PURPOSE: To help students improve their spelling, increase their vocabularies, learn concepts, and develop correct English usage that will help them all their lives.

This Saturday at 1 p.m. in downtown Washington, Amaré Jarvis, age 10, competes with students from throughout eastern North Carolina – all hoping to advance in this most iconic of scholastic competitions.

Last week, during a brief interview in a fast food restaurant, Amaré — along with his parents Tamaro Jarvis and Monique Sawyer — experienced one of the benefits from being in the local limelight. Hardee’s general manager, Diane Lambert; and supervisor, Tilena Snider; presented the youngster with a valuable gift certificate – enough to feed all three at some future date!

Recalling the elementary school’s recent spelling bee, Amaré said: “I prayed before it started,” which helped him stay calm during a usually frenetic experience.

“It’s a lot of hard work,” said his father, clearly proud of his son’s achievement. “It really takes sacrifice.”

Charter School to herald $8.9 million expansion

Click to enlarge

By Maureen Donald

ARAPAHOE — A fun-filled afternoon is planned at Arapahoe Charter School Friday, April 7, from 1:30 until 3 to celebrate 20 years as the area’s only public regional school of choice and mark construction of an $8.9 million expansion.

Since 1997, Arapahoe Charter School has provided a learning environment that offers the kind of individualized instruction and family atmosphere that is unique among both Pamlico County and surrounding counties schools. Enrollment has doubled in the 20 years since its creation, in part because its academic excellence and supportive learning environment have attracted students beyond Pamlico County.

Of the 520 students now served, over one-half come from outside county school systems. Five years ago, in response to the overwhelming demand from our parents, a high school program was added offering the Arapahoe Charter School experience to students from kindergarten through high school.

With a projected graduation rate of 96 percent, parents and staff take pride in preparing students with what they need to succeed in education and in life. As our programs have grown and developed, our physical facilities have not. For that reason, the Board of Directors has committed to providing permanent state-of-the-art buildings for our students.

Thanks to a generous combination of investments from Arapahoe Charter School and Tideland EMC, in addition to a USDA Rural Development loan, we have embarked on an exciting building initiative to create 18 K- 8 classrooms, three exceptional children’s rooms, a media center and a new cafeteria and kitchen. It is with pride and a great deal of excitement that the entire Arapahoe Charter School family invites the community to celebrate this wonderful event.

Editor’s note: For more information, contact Maureen Donald at (252) 675-3128, or e-mail her at: mmd@bbdpublishing.com

Statue dedication ceremony set for March 22

Welding students, instructor create one-of-a-kind tribute to community college

On one side, a great blue heron takes flight.

By Attila Nemecz
Public Relations Coordinator
Beaufort County Community College

WASHINGTON — Beaufort County Community College plans to dedicate a sculpture created by its welding students and instructor as part of the school’s 50th anniversary. Although everyone is welcome, officials have issued a special invitation to all those who attended BCCC during the 1967 – 1969 period, the college’s first three years of operation!

The dedication ceremony has been scheduled for Wednesday, March 22, at noon.

Welding instructor Ted Clayton has been working on the statue for seven years, getting materials donated from PotashCorp, Flanders Filters and Carver Machine Works. He went to the “boneyard” at PotashCorp looking for scrap metal, and when he told them what he wanted to do, they laughed and told him to grab anything he needed.

Welding students have had a chance to express their artistic side while learning the proper welds. The 5,000-pound metal sculpture features a school of fish swimming around pilings. On top of the pilings is an osprey circling its next with chicks inside. On the back is a great blue heron.

“I love to fish. I’m huge about the Pamlico River. If you ride from here to Ocracoke, you will pass all of these pilings, and they all have nests on them,” said Clayton. “It hit me one morning when I was riding out with my dog. It’s pretty right here. You cannot take from the Pamlico. It holds its own against anywhere in the world.”

The 5,000 pound metal sculpture depicts a school of fish circling pilings, while an osprey lands in its nest.

The work on the statue has taken place entirely outside of class. Students have enthusiastically volunteered to contribute to it. When he first told students about his idea, they laughed at him. Once they started working on the sculpture, “sparkles started coming in their eyes,” according to Clayton. “They realize, ‘what can’t you do with a piece of metal?’”

The statue will sit on Campus Drive East leading to Building 10 and Building 5. NC Community College System President Dr. Jimmie Williamson, former BCCC President Dr. David McLawhorn, current BCCC President Dr. Barbara Tansey and instructor Ted Clayton will speak at the event.

BCCC was chartered as a technical institute nearly 50 years ago, but its roots in the community run even deeper. Industrial and technical education was offered in Beaufort County in 1962 through an Industrial Education Center. The center was first affiliated with Lenoir County Technical Institute and later with Pitt Technical Institute.

Local businessman A. Graham Elliott was an early supporter of industrial education in Beaufort County. In 1967, Elliott, then chairman of the Advisory Committee of the Industrial Education Center, said, “There is a real need for spreading trade and technical educational benefits to greater numbers in Beaufort County. It is necessary that we take a serious look at this type of institution called the technical institute.”

Two events that same year made a stand-alone technical institute for Beaufort County possible ― local voters on approved a $500,000 bond issue by a vote of nearly three to one, and State Sen. Ashley B. Futrell and State Rep. William R. Roberson Jr. introduced legislation in their respective chambers of the N.C. General Assembly establishing Beaufort County Technical Institute.

On Aug. 23, 1968, 39 graduates received their diplomas at BCTI’s first graduation. Almost 50 years later, BCCC conferred 190 degrees, diplomas and certificates on the Class of 2016, including 45 Associate’s Degrees in Nursing.

In 1969 a permanent site for BCTI was purchased, and construction of the school’s campus on U.S. 264 began. After being housed in temporary locations throughout the county, including a former prison farm and in space above what was then the local fire department, BCTI moved to its current location in the spring of 1971.

The campus sits on the former Woodrow Sheppard farm, which was sold to the BCTI Board of Trustees by Fred and Mary Sheppard. Another tract was sold to the college by Vandalia Sykes. The last land purchase was from Linda Byrd and Roger Woolard in 2015.

With more than 400 employees, 2,100 students enrolled in its Curriculum programs, and 4,400 in Continuing Education, BCCC is a driving force in the economic development of the region. Under the leadership today of Dr. Barbara Tansey, the school’s fifth president, Beaufort County Community College initiates collaborative efforts among community and government agencies, provides innovative technology, and builds strong relationships with business and industry.

Alumni and employees from 1967-1969 should contact Serena Sullivan at 252-940-6326 if they would like to take part in the dedication ceremony.

Hometown hoopster budding star for March Madness-bound UNC-W

Known as ‘J-5’ on the court, Jaylen Fornes impressive as Seahawk freshman guard

 

In a nod to Jaylen’s jersey number, teammates call the freshman guard ‘J-5’

ORLANDO – Early Thursday afternoon, UNC-Wilmington takes on the University of Virginia Cavaliers in a first round game of the NCAA basketball tournament. Expect plenty of cheers throughout Pamlico County as local fans hope Jaylen Fornes can work his magic as a freshman guard for the Seahawks.

Fornes, 19, played varsity basketball for one year at Pamlico County High School, before transferring to Word of God High School in Raleigh. He started for the Hurricanes as a freshman, which was a good indicator of his talent, according to Garry Cooper, a former Seahawk star in the early 1980s.

“You could see the gift he was blessed with, even when he was playing in the seventh and eighth grades,” recalled Cooper, who is now the Director of the Pamlico County Recreation Department. Cooper should know – he is a member of the UNC-W Basketball Hall of Fame, and predicts good things for the young athlete.

“I didn’t get a chance to coach him, but he was well-loved here, and a very good ballplayer,” said Cooper, during a brief telephone interview Wednesday morning. “If he keeps working hard, and sticks with it, Jaylen could possibly make the Hall of Fame himself – that’s how good I think he can be.”

Jaylen retains strong Pamlico County roots. His mother Rebecca Fornes, older brothers Jake and Lucas, and grandparents Dennis and Lola Fornes live in the area. All will undoubtedly be tuned in – either courtside (like Mom) — or glued to the TV set Thursday afternoon.

“Jaylen came home for Thanksgiving,” said Rebecca, “but the team had to practice Christmas Day.”

The move to Raleigh, early in his high school career, was a plus for Jaylen, said his mother, but his biggest exposure to college recruiters came during summer months, while playing AAU basketball. She said 22 colleges expressed an interest in Jaylen, before he decided on UNC-W, adding that the big decision was predicated in part upon the great reputation of UNC-W Head Coach, Kevin Keatts.

“We learned that college scouts don’t care too much about high school performance,” said Rebecca. “In Jaylen’s case, it seemed to be all about what he did during the AAU games. He’s on a full scholarship, and he’s got a 3.2 Grade Point Average, so we are mighty proud of him.”


#5 Jaylen Fornes

2016-17 (FRESHMAN GUARD – UNC-W Seahawks: 6’4” 210 lbs.)

-Played final minute in CAA championship game vs. College of Charleston
-Played 10 minutes and grabbed four rebounds vs. W&M in CAA semifinals
-Scored two points with two rebounds in CAA quarterfinals vs. Delaware
-Played nine minutes vs. Towson and scored eight points
-Scored three points and had career-high four rebounds at Elon
-Started for second straight game vs. JMU and had eight points and two assists
-Made first career start and responded with career-high 17 points vs. Delaware
-Scored eight points at William & Mary
-Contributed seven points vs. Drexel
-Collected five points and three rebounds vs. W&M
-Had season-high seven points vs. Pfeiffer
-Scored four points in six minutes vs. Toledo
-Had season-high five points vs. Middle Tennessee State on Nov. 25, 2016
-Came off the bench to play nine minutes at Eastern Kentucky
-Scored three points and grabbed two rebounds in collegiate debut vs. Claflin

GENERAL FACTS
-Athletic scoring guard who should contribute right away for Seahawks
-Four-year scholarship to UNC-W
-Current Grade Point Average of 3.2

HIGH SCHOOL
-Played as freshman at Pamlico County High School in Bayboro, N.C.
-Transferred to Word of God Christian Academy in Raleigh, N.C.
-Played for Coach Brian Clifton at Word of God
-Member of varsity team for four seasons
-Also played football at Word of God
-Indications of interest from 22 colleges, before choosing UNC-W

PERSONAL
-Full Name: Jaylen Aaron Fornes
-Born in Grantsboro, N.C.
-Son of Corey Green and Rebecca Fornes
-Played for ‘Team Loaded’ of AAU

Class of ’75 celebrates Christmas

ALLIANCE – This close-knit group of former classmates at Pamlico County High School always carves out time each year for a Holiday Celebration. First row: Kenny Smith and Robert Boomer. Second row: Teresa Davis, Aquila Jones, Sally Watson Credle, Amelia Saunders, Betty Lou Barber, Vanessa Midgette, Barbara Wright, and Maddie Nelson. Third row: Garfield Credle, William Jones, Margaret Tatum Murrell, Delseia Moore, Hazel Credle, and Ricky Glasper. Fourth row: Darrell ‘Bouncer’ Jenkins, Roger Sawyer, and Jerry Gibbs.

Little known facts about the Electoral College

Things they didn’t teach in high school civics!

elect

A vote for the Presidential and Vice Presidential candidates named on the ballot is actually a vote for the electors of the Party. Typically, electors are steadfast Party operatives, having held leadership positions or they have been chosen to recognize years of loyal service.

Key Electoral College Dates and Events

  • November 8, 2016—Election Day:
    The voters in each State choose electors to serve in the Electoral College. As soon as election results are final, the States prepare seven original “Certificates of Ascertainment” of the electors chosen, and send one original along with two certified copies to the Archivist of the United States at the Office of the Federal Register.
  • December 19, 2016—Meeting of Electors:
    The electors in each State meet to select the President and Vice President of the United States. The Electors record their votes on six “Certificates of Vote,” which are paired with the six remaining original “Certificates of Ascertainment.” The electors sign, seal and certify the packages of electoral votes and immediately send them to the Federal and State officials listed in these instructions.
  • December 28, 2016—Deadline for Receipt of Electoral Votes:
    The President of the Senate, the Archivist of the United States, and other designated Federal and State officials must have the electoral votes in hand.
  • January 6, 2017—Counting Electoral Votes in Congress:
    The Congress meets in joint session to count the electoral votes (unless Congress passes a law to change the date).

Each Certificate of Ascertainment lists the names of the state’s electors, and is typically signed by the sitting governor. North Carolina’s document for 2016 has not yet been completed, but we’re happy to give you a sampling of what one looks like. Here, from the Presidential election of 2012 (in which Republican Mitt Romney won North Carolina) is part of a Certificate of Ascertainment signed on Dec. 4, 2012, by then Gov. Beverly Perdue:

Top half of Page One from first pdf

Quite soon, Gov. Pat McCrory is expected to file a Certificate of Ascertainment for 2016. In that document, he will list the names of the state’s 15 Presidential electors for 2016:

                                                                Single Page from second pdf

Don’t be alarmed if you have never heard of these people – it’s the way the system works! About all you need to know is that members of this exclusive group (for the most part) are loyal Republicans – no Hillary votes here!!

The U.S. Supreme Court has held that the Constitution does not require Electors be completely free to act as they choose and therefore, political parties may extract pledges from electors to vote for the parties’ nominees. Some state laws provide that so-called “faithless Electors” may be subject to fines or disqualified for casting an invalid vote. The following states have some type of mechanism – pledge, statute, or law — to deal with that rare breed — a ‘faithless Elector!’ But, keep in mind that  no Elector has ever been prosecuted for failing to vote as pledged:

ALABAMA – Party Pledge / State Law – § 17-19-2
ALASKA – Party Pledge / State Law – § 15.30.040; 15.30.070
CALIFORNIA – State Law – Elections Code § 6906
COLORADO – State Law – § 1-4-304
CONNECTICUT – State Law – § 9-175
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA – DC Pledge / DC Law – § 1-1001.08(g)
FLORIDA – Party Pledge / State Law – § 103.021(1)
HAWAII – State Law – §§ 14-26 to 14-28
MAINE – State Law – § 805
MARYLAND – State Law – § 8-505
MASSACHUSETTS – Party Pledge / State Law – Ch. 53, § 8, Supp.
MICHIGAN – State Law – § 168.47 (Violation cancels vote and Elector is replaced.)
MISSISSIPPI – Party Pledge / State Law – § 23-15-785(3)
MONTANA – State Law – § 13-25-304
NEBRASKA – State Law – § 32-714
NEW MEXICO – State Law – § 1-15-5 to 1-15-9 (Violation is a fourth degree felony.)
NORTH CAROLINA – State Law – § 163-212 (Violation cancels vote; elector is replaced and is subject to $500 fine.)
OHIO – State Law – § 3505.40
OKLAHOMA – State Pledge / State Law – 26, §§ 10-102; 10-109 (Violation of oath is a misdemeanor, carrying a fine of up to $1000.)
OREGON – State Pledge / State Law – § 248.355
SOUTH CAROLINA – State Pledge / State Law – § 7-19-80 (Replacement and criminal sanctions for violation.)
VERMONT – State Law – title 17, § 2732
VIRGINIA – State Law – § 24.2-202
WASHINGTON – Party Pledge / State Law – §§ 29.71.020, 29.71.040, Supp. ($1000 fine.)
WISCONSIN – State Law – § 7.75
WYOMING – State Law – §§ 22-19-106; 22-19-108


Why the Electoral College is a good thing for our nation!

By Raynor James

The founders of our country were very concerned about creating a government that would protect the rights of each individual citizen.  A pure democracy does not do that.  A pure democracy is mob rule, or as a friend says, “It’s two wolves and a sheep voting on the lunch menu.”

Our founders went to great pains setting up a series of checks and balances.  Our general government was divided into three separate branches so that one part made the laws, a second part adjudicated the laws, and a third part enforced the laws.  Additionally, the general (or federal) government was given only limited powers.  All other powers were retained by the several states or by the people themselves.

Within the part of the general government that makes laws, there are two bodies, the House of Representatives and the Senate.  The number of House members each state has varies based on the population of the state. However, each state has equal representation in the Senate. For example: Rhode Island and Texas – vastly different in geographic size and population — are equal in the Senate. Each have two U.S. Senators.

It took much time and negotiation to come up with the formula for the legislative branch of the government because the states that had smaller populations did not want to give up their sovereignty to the states with larger populations.

When it came to electing a President, our founders decided on a formula that was an amalgam.  Each state would have the same number of Electors as the total of its members of the Senate and its members of the House. That formula gives more populous states an advantage, but it is not an unlimited advantage.  Further, each state decides how it will choose its Electors and whether those Electors will be “winner take all” (the winner of the popular vote in that state receives all of that state’s Electoral votes) or “proportional” (the same percentage of that state’s Electors vote for each candidate as that state’s voters did).

Our founders were very careful to retain as much power as was compatible with safety and order in the hands of each of the states and in the hands of individual citizens.  They were very vigilant about counterbalancing power.  Do we have any reason to be less vigilant?

Electoral College: Course 101

Big day set for Dec. 19.  The nitty-gritty no one learns in school! See Page B-12

NORTH CAROLINA — If you pulled the lever, checked a box, or pressed a video screen – thinking that you were voting for Donald Trump in the recent Presidential election – you are mistaken!  You were actually casting a 15-way joint vote for a group of political types known as ‘Presidential Electors.

The number of Presidential electors in any individual state is equal to the number of United States Senators and Representatives. In North Carolina, the figure is 15. Don’t get confused – the North Carolinians filling those individual seats in Congress ARE NOT THE ELECTORS!

We’re talking about an entirely different group of 15 people. They are living, breathing people, of course – and in most instances they are avid fans of the political process. However, chances are good that you’ve never heard of them!


Why the Electoral College is a good thing for our nation!

By Raynor James \ News Opinion \ Special to The County Compass

The founders of our country were very concerned about creating a government that would protect the rights of each individual citizen.  A pure democracy does not do that.  A pure democracy is mob rule, or as a friend says, “It’s two wolves and a sheep voting on the lunch menu.”

Our founders went to great pains setting up a series of checks and balances.  Our general government was divided into three separate branches so that one part made the laws, a second part adjudicated the laws, and a third part enforced the laws.  Additionally, the general (or federal) government was given only limited powers.  All other powers were retained by the several states or by the people themselves.

Within the part of the general government that makes laws, there are two bodies, the House of Representatives and the Senate.  The number of House members each state has varies based on the population of the state. However, each state has equal representation in the Senate. For example: Rhode Island and Texas – vastly different in geographic size and population — are equal in the Senate. Each have two U.S. Senators.

It took much time and negotiation to come up with the formula for the legislative branch of the government because the states that had smaller populations did not want to give up their sovereignty to the states with larger populations.

When it came to electing a President, our founders decided on a formula that was an amalgam.  Each state would have the same number of Electors as the total of its members of the Senate and its members of the House. That formula gives more populous states an advantage, but it is not an unlimited advantage.  Further, each state decides how it will choose its Electors and whether those Electors will be “winner take all” (the winner of the popular vote in that state receives all of that state’s Electoral votes) or “proportional” (the same percentage of that state’s Electors vote for each candidate as that state’s voters did).

Our founders were very careful to retain as much power as was compatible with safety and order in the hands of each of the states and in the hands of individual citizens.  They were very vigilant about counterbalancing power.  Do we have any reason to be less vigilant?

‘Aspiration For A Better Tomorrow’ issues challenge to mayor (and others)

ham

mimeAURORA – Give Clif Williams, mayor of this town, some credit. Saturday afternoon, he quickly accepted a challenge from Zina Ham, outreach coordinator of New Growth Unlimited Ministries.

The well-publicized event, which included mime ministry artist Nick Stokes, was designed to spur citizen involvement in the lives of at-risk youngsters. Ham – quite congenially – interrupted the mayor’s remarks to ask: “If we were to identify a child over the next year or two with a GPA of at least 2.7 would you, Mr. Mayor, offer an incentive of $100 for that young person to purchase supplies and schools items?”

Williams nodded enthusiastically but then countered: “Aren’t you setting the goal a little low at just 2.7? Why don’t we give that child a $100 gift for those things, but if he or she gets it up to a 3.0 then they will receive $200 from me?”

Thus an already ambitious program – quite unexpectedly — received a quantum leap of energy. Accolades are also in order for the Aurora Recreation Department and Aurora’s other churches that have embraced the ‘Aspiration’ challenge for the town’s youngsters.
Another active participant is Joy Dunn. If you – or anyone you know – would like to accept the challenge, e-mail Dunn at: joydunn05@gmail.com

A new generation of nurses: Chelsea Huggins

Huggins practices ‘hands on’ care.

Huggins practices ‘hands on’ care.

WASHINGTON, NC— Chelsea Huggins discovered that everyone is on the same page when they start the nursing program at Beaufort County Community College. The students who have two years of experience as certified nurse aides, and the students who just walked in the door might have the same skills it takes to be a great nurse.

This was a relief to Huggins, who at 18, is the youngest student working toward an Associate Degree in Nursing.

Huggins came to the community college almost by accident. She managed to speed through high school in just three years at New Bern High. Her plan was to attend ECU and become a doctor, following her passion for the healthcare field. After some volunteer experience in a hospital, she decided she was more interested in the hands-on approach of a nurse. Her goal changed to becoming a nurse practitioner.

At 17, she applied for the ‘RIBN’ program at ECU. This program, short for Regionally Increasing Baccalaureate Nurses, is a statewide program that hopes to put more nurses with four-year degrees into the workforce. The program is a collaboration between community colleges and nursing schools, like ECU’s College of Nursing.

The program assigned Huggins to Beaufort County Community College, who first thought she was heading to the Town of Beaufort, and nearby beach, in Carteret County. After coming to terms with the fact that she was attending college in Beaufort County, she fell in love with BCCC!

With the growing expense of universities and the limited slots in their programs, many students are turning to community college not just for a two-year ADN, but as a step toward a four-year BSN. Students can also find smaller class sizes and more institutional support at a community college like BCCC. The college has a person on staff, just to help nursing students through the admissions process and with their testing requirements.

Since she began her studies at BCCC, Huggins has had opportunity to transfer to Craven Community College in New Bern and return to her family, but she has enjoyed her experience at BCCC so much that she has stayed in Washington. She found that the support was lacking at larger institutions.

“The faculty go out of their way to care about you,” said Huggins. She was named a BCCC ambassador, a title awarded to the best representatives of BCCC. An ambassador gets their tuition covered for a year in exchange for speaking and helping at community events. She is also the recipient of the James Franklin and Hannah Roberson Bagwell Scholarship and a member of the Beaufort County Association of Nursing Students (BCANS).

She has come to embrace the diversity in the nursing department, including the age range and the lifestyles of other students. She has found that the best study partners are her older classmates and the ones with children. Intergenerational studying not only takes place in the classroom, but in her family as well. Huggins’s grandmother is a retired physician.

“She’s made me a perfectionist about things,” she said.

Her grandmother makes her practice until she has it right. Ultimately she plans to work as a neonatal nurse either at VidantHospital or UNC Health Care. She wants to deal with both parents and infants.

“My heart has led me in that direction,” she said.

This young lady’s fortitude means she can handle the toughest of situations. Huggins has no patience for the cynicism of some of the nurses currently working in the field. Her age will not slow her down! Huggins’ skill, passion and empathy put her on the same level as her classmates. She may have

Local community college ranked third in nation

PCC-logo-color

GRANTSBORO – Pamlico Community College recently received national recognition as one of America’s premier community colleges by WalletHub, a personal finance website.

Surpassed only by New York’s Helene Fuld College of Nursing, and Alaska’s Ilisagvik College, Pamlico Community College has been judged to be the third best community college in America – among more than 1200 similar institutions.

Pamlico Community College earned high marks for its low student-to-teacher ratio (just nine students for every one teacher) and its high graduation rate, which came in fifth best throughout the USA.

On the job less than a month, new PCC President Jim Ross probably considered the accolade as the best possible (and early) Christmas gift. He described the recognition as a credit to the school’s outstanding faculty and staff.

“To be judged the third best community college in our nation is a tremendous honor to our employees and all associated with our college,” said Ross. “This is no surprise to me as I consider PCC’s employees to be unsurpassed in our nation. One of the secrets in higher education is that students can get a great education at community colleges!”

Visit www.pamlicocc.edu to learn more about PCC.

Pamlico County Sheriff’s Office “back to school” supply drive

N1607P22013CSheriff Chris Davis
Pamlico County

The Pamlico County Sheriff’s Office, with help from our citizens and schools, will be doing a “back to school” supply drive. We have contacted our county schools and asked for a list of items they feel are needed by students when they return to school. All items will be given to each individual school; where school staff will give it to the students in need or give as needs arise. We feel the school can better identify where the greatest needs are. We understand that families fall on hard times; we see it every day and feel that it is our responsibility to help carry some of the burden. This is our opportunity to invest in our future and the future of Pamlico County.

A list of supplies that are needed:

#2 Pencils
Kids Scissors
Crayons
Glue Sticks
Erasers (Large Pink)
Book Bags
Colored Pencils
Cap Erasers
Highlighters
Black/White Composition Notebooks
Poster Board for Projects
Hand Sanitizer
Clorox Wipes
Ear Buds
2” 3-ring binder
3” 3-ring binder
Marbled Journal Notebooks
Loose Sleeve Paper
Index Cards
Lysol Spray
Black Ink Pens
Dry Erase Markers
Kleenex
Mechanical Pencils
Glue Bottles
Wide-Rule Notebook Paper
1 Subject spiral notebooks
3 x 5 index Cards
Protractors
Graph Paper
Dividers
Sheet Protectors
Copy Paper
Plastic Folders with 2 pockets and fasteners
Headphones

We will be running the school supply drive until August 22, 2016. Please bring your donated items to the Pamlico County Sheriff’s Office anytime, between now and August 22. We hope we can count on you to help offset the cost of supplies for parents, teachers and our schools. Together we can make a difference!